Tagged HIV/AIDS

Life Lessons

Life Lessons Learned: Research with ICAP in Swaziland

by Loxley Bennett, 2015 ICAP Swaziland HIV/AIDS Research Fellow, Columbia University Neuroscience & Behavior ’15. This post was published in collaboration with ICAP.   Going into the summer with ICAP, I expected to learn about global health and the tools used to conduct medical research, but that hardly describes my summer in Swaziland. These experiences…

Behind the Alphabet Soup: Addressing Swaziland’s Number One Killer

I have to warn you, there are a lot of acronyms in this post. I could probably string together a sentence composed of three-letter acronyms to describe it.  So here we go: Link4Health (L4H) is a combination strategy to approaching HIV treatment here in Swaziland. It’s a two-arm program, which means that people will be randomly…

A Brief Introduction: HIV Research in Swaziland

by Loxley Denzil Christopher Bennett II, Columbia College Senior majoring in neuroscience & behavior For the past few weeks, I have been working with ICAP.  Although the organization is only 10 years old, it has played an instrumental role in global health, particularly in scaling up HIV prevention and care by working with institutions in sub-Saharan…

Immersion Experience: My Practicum with ICAP in Mozambique

by Jonathan Platt, MPH ’13 in Epidemiology When I arrived in Maputo, the capital city of Mozambique, in July 2012, I was immediately delivered to the doorstep of a colleague who had been gracious enough to offer her spare bedroom. Her house was filled with children fully engaged in a game involving balloons and screaming, as well as several women cooking dinner, tending to children, and chatting too rapidly for me to follow. Armed with the Portuguese capacity of a 2-year-old (that was my limit; I tried and failed to chat with 3-year-olds), I attempted to introduce myself to my…

Beyond The Oath: A Letter to My Fellow 2012 Graduates

 By Keletso Makofane, MPH ’12 in Biostatistics Friends, Twenty-five years ago last month, Larry Kramer, playwright and activist, stood up at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Services Center in New York City and asked two-thirds of the room to do the same. He told those who were standing that they would all be dead in five years: “If my speech tonight doesn’t scare the shit out of you, we’re in trouble. If what you’re hearing doesn’t rouse you to anger, fury, rage, and action, gay men will have no future here on Earth. How long does it take before you get…